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"This is Japan": A Hot Spring With a Breathtaking Views

Onsen is the Japanese word for hot spring; hot springs contain specific ingredients and gush forth from the ground. Soaking in a warm bathtub not only reduces weariness and relaxes the body, but the ingredients in hot springs can also help with a variety of other symptoms.  


Nyuto Onsenkyo, a well secluded hot spring popular with hot spring enthusiasts all across Japan
Nyuto Onsenkyo, a well secluded hot spring popular with hot spring enthusiasts all across Japan

Basic Onsen Etiquette to Know Before Bathing

Japanese people are very accustomed to hot springs, but those who have never bathed in one, such as visitors from other countries, may be unfamiliar with how to enter a hot spring or the etiquette involved. Here are some fundamental guidelines for bathing in a hot spring.


If you are staying at a hot spring hotel, take the towel and bath towel provided in your guest room and proceed to the bathhouse. The entrance to the bathhouse is frequently marked by a blue curtain for men and a red curtain for women. Inside the changing rooms, there are baskets for storing personal goods; place your bath towels and clothes in the baskets; make sure you remove your underwear as well. If you have valuables, use the lockers in the changing room.


Nyuto Onsenkyo, a well secluded hot spring popular with hot spring enthusiasts all across Japan
Nyuto Onsenkyo, a well secluded hot spring popular with hot spring enthusiasts all across Japan

When you're ready, grab a towel for washing and go inside the bathhouse. Bathhouses are usually separated into two types: indoor baths, which have bathtubs inside, and open-air baths, which have bathtubs outside. We propose that you bathe in the indoor baths first because the open-air baths may not have showers or washing areas to clean your body.

Before soaking in the bathtub, wash your body and hair in the washing area to avoid contaminating the water. You are welcome to use the shampoo and other goods available in the washing area. When using the shower in the washing area, take care not to splash hot water on anyone around you. If you have long hair, tie it after washing it to avoid hair getting into the bathtub.


Pour hot water over yourself before entering the bathtub to avoid a sudden increase in blood pressure. Fill a bucket with hot water from the bathtub and slowly pour it over your feet, which are far from your heart, to adapt your body to the heat of the water. After that, carefully immerse yourself in the bathtub, beginning with your feet, and take a half-body bath in which you soak in the hot water up to your waist. Once you've become used to it, soak up to your shoulders and take a full-body bath. Enjoy the sensation of hot spring water while admiring the surrounding environment. Please note that as a general rule, you are not allowed to put the towel you used to wash your body into the bathtub.


Nyuto Onsenkyo, a well secluded hot spring popular with hot spring enthusiasts all across Japan
Nyuto Onsenkyo, a well secluded hot spring popular with hot spring enthusiasts all across Japan

Soaking in a hot spring bath for too long, while beneficial to your health, might trigger a rush of blood to the head or leave you feeling chilly. When you begin to sweat gently, it is time to get out of the tub. When exiting the bathroom, use a towel to wipe up any water from your body so that the changing room floor does not become wet. To keep the medicinal properties of the hot spring from wearing off, avoid rinsing it off your body in the shower. However, this does not apply to persons with sensitive skin or when the spring quality is overstimulating.


After bathing, it is best to rest for 30 minutes to an hour to enable the body to recover. Because the body loses water while bathing, it is essential to rehydrate thoroughly. Bathing in hot springs should not be done immediately before or after eating. It is advised to avoid having a bath after consuming alcohol and to relax for a while after heavy exercise before bathing. It is also recommended to bathe only two to three times a day to minimize dizziness induced by long hot baths.


Nyuto Onsenkyo, a well secluded hot spring popular with hot spring enthusiasts all across Japan
Nyuto Onsenkyo, a well secluded hot spring popular with hot spring enthusiasts all across Japan

Onsen (hot springs) can improve health and wellness depending on how you bathe. Enjoy the benefits of hot springs for your body and mind by bathing in a way that does not strain your body.


Since ancient times, many people have visited places where there are hot springs for medical treatment and sightseeing, resulting in the development of a distinct local hot spring culture. Hot springs have a wide range of characteristics, from secluded hot springs that are one with nature and full of rustic beauty to hot spring resorts where you can stroll through the town full of stores.

 


Nyuto Onsenkyo, a well secluded hot spring popular with hot spring enthusiasts all across Japan
Nyuto Onsenkyo, a well secluded hot spring popular with hot spring enthusiasts all across Japan

There are many unique hot spring resorts in the Tohoku region, but the one described here is a secluded spot tucked away in the midst of lush nature that has piqued the interest of hot spring enthusiasts from all over Japan, who wish to visit at least once because of its uniqueness.


Nyuto Onsenkyo, a well secluded hot spring popular with hot spring enthusiasts all across Japan
Nyuto Onsenkyo, a well secluded hot spring popular with hot spring enthusiasts all across Japan

Nostalgic scenery with a traditional Japanese vibe. The hot spring baths provide an open-air bathing experience with breathtaking views of the great outdoors. Each of these hot springs is recognized for its "Japanese-ness" and "Tohoku-ness."


Nyuto Onsenkyo, a well-secluded hot spring popular with hot spring enthusiasts all across Japan. a popular hot spring resort, promises to offer you an experience that exceeds your expectations, which increases in proportion to the duration of your travel time.


One is that in this untouched nature, there are hot springs with a wide variety of spring qualities. Nyuto Onsenkyo is located at the foot of Mt. Nyuto in Towada-Hachimantai National Park, where virgin beech forests still exist. There are over ten varieties of hot springs with a wide range of spring qualities, and each of the seven hot spring inns scattered around the area has its own source, making it unique even within Japan.


For example, "Tsurunoyu Onsen," the oldest of the hot spring resorts, offers four distinct types of springs with varying qualities. Although they all appear cloudy, they each contain various ingredients, allowing you to enjoy four distinct textures and benefits. The open-air baths, with their cloudy white water gushing out from beneath the feet, are particularly well-known as being symbolic of Nyuto Onsenkyo.


Nyuto Onsenkyo, a well secluded hot spring popular with hot spring enthusiasts all across Japan
Nyuto Onsenkyo, a well secluded hot spring popular with hot spring enthusiasts all across Japan

Taenoyu, a modern Japanese-style hot spring hotel with historical furnishings, features two sources of hot spring water. The first is "Kin-no-Yu," a cloudy water that changes color depending on the weather, and the second is "Gin-no-Yu," a clear, colorless water that feels soft against the skin, and each has its own set of benefits. Kyuka Mura Nyuto-Onsenkyo, the hot spring resort's most modern facility, gets hot water from two sources. Each of them fills the large bathtubs to the full, offering a pleasant greeting to visitors who want to soak in the hot spring water.


Nyuto Onsenkyo, a well secluded hot spring popular with hot spring enthusiasts all across Japan
Nyuto Onsenkyo, a well secluded hot spring popular with hot spring enthusiasts all across Japan

Another feature of Nyuto Onsenkyo is that it still has the feel of a traditional hot spring resort. The hot springs at Nyuto Onsenkyo have long been known as providing a "hot-spring cure" for disease and injury, with many people staying for long-term treatment. The nostalgic emotions of the therapeutic baths merge wonderfully with the natural surroundings, creating a stunning traditional Japanese landscape.


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